16/05/2012 - Guatemala

Make it visible to sensitize

The work team of the Organización de Mujeres en Superación (OMES) celebrated the International Day of the Rights of Sex Workers Women in various events.
Caminata por el Día internacional por los derechos de las trabajadoras sexuales

In Guatemala, OMES celebrate with other organizations fighting for the rights of sex workers women (OTRANS, Reynas de la noche, Función Marco Antonio, Gente Positiva, La Sala, LAMDA, SIDA & Societat, RED MPA, MAUX). This alliance has tended to concentrate efforts to enforce their rights.

During the first day of celebrations under the motto "I am not a whore or prostitute, I am a sex worker", a press conference was organized in which they vindicated the sex work, and requested that the rights of women are respected as part of society.

The second day was an activity on the street: a walk of about 4 hours through the center of Guatemala, in which more than 200 people participated. “The activity, as well as to make visible and raise awareness on the rights of sex workers of Guatemala, aimed at the reading of a denounce statement on violations of human rights in our country and police abuses of authority against our fellows who work in parks and on the street in some municipalities and departments,” said Yanira Tobar, OMES maximum referent.

We read our claims and demand an end to the raids of the police, actors involved in health care and local governance, because they took our fellows who work in the street, assuming they are being exploited or are part of trafficking networks and it is their duty to rescue us,” said Tobar.

In the statement, we also requested the amendment of Law 09-2009 on the grounds that it violates the freedom of choice on the right to choose the work you want to exercise.

The three-day celebration ended with a screening at the Human Rights Ombudsman’s Office, the documentary "Sex, dignity and death”, which tells the harsh story of Sandra Cabrera, Argentinean activist of Human Rights, member of A.M.M.A.R., killed in 2006 and whose case remains unresolved. “We chose to screen this film because, as in the case of Sandra, we argue that our greatest oppressor here is the police, who are in many cases the worst violators of rights,” concluded Tobar.

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